flyctory.com

Geysir Hot Spring Area (Iceland – Pictured Story)

What is your first thought about Iceland? I think many people associate the stunning, unique nature with the Nordic island – and especially think of hot water springs. There are places like Myvatn Geothermal Pools or the Blue Lagoon on the one hand – and the geysers on the other. The big Geysir and especially the very reliable Strokkur are a must visit for any tourist on the island – and are thus part of the “Golden Circle” Tour. With this Pictured Story, I take to hot water bubbles and fountains.

 

Geysir Hot Spring Area – Location and Access

The Hot Spring Area is located at route 35. The road is not a restricted road in this area – the later section of the road (F35) is at least banned for certain rental cars. The Gullfoss waterfall is not too far away from the geysers. Another quite popular attraction in the region is the lovely Laugarvatn Fontana geothermal bath.

The geyser area is open to public any time and there is no entrance. Opposite the road is a service area with a souvenir place and shop, a (card only) petrol station and two hotels, which belong together. I stayed at the Litli Geysir Hotel, which also gives you a late evening relaxed walk to this site. The service facilities are open from 10:00 to 18:00 hrs.

 

Pictures from Geysir Hot Spring Area

Below are some snaps from the Geysir area. Unfortunately, the weather at my visit was not ideal – if you have a clear day without clouds, you will have a better experience. The three “stars” of the grounds are the three geysers Litli Geysir (“Small Geyser”), Geysir (“Geyser”, also “Large Geysir”) and especially Strokkur, which means “Butter Barrel”. The small geyser is really small. Its giant brother is very impressive, but you need a lot of luck to see the eruption. It may reach heights of up to one hundred meters. However, the eruptions happen rather rarely. Strokkur is Mr Reliable in the geyser world. The water is shot upwards to up to around thirty meters above soil. The time between two eruptions is roughly every ten minutes, which turns it to a massive tourist attraction – eruption sighting is practically guaranteed.

Due to the reliability of Strokkur, you typically already see the first eruptions while you walk along the footpath from the parking lot to the geysers. On that route, you pass along small thermal springs. You can watch the geysers from different angles. You typically meet the large geyser last on your trip. Using soap or washing power to attract the geyser, which has been done in earlier decades, is by the way strictly illegal nowadays. As you typically watch a couple of Strokkur eruptions while being around and have a look into the visitors’ center, I would at least suggest to block some 60 to 90 minutes for your time at the geysers. If possible, try to avoid the later morning to early afternoon hours, when bus tours flood the area.

 

Flyctory.com and Iceland

Here are all my postings related to Iceland:

 

Flyctory.com about Animal Parks & Zoos

Here are all postings of the Zoos and More category:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.